What Is Service Level Agreement Synonym

Measures must motivate good behaviour. When defining metrics, both parties should keep in mind that the purpose of metrics is to motivate appropriate behavior on behalf of the service provider and customer. A service level agreement is an agreement between two or more parties, one being the customer and the other being the service provider. It can be a legally binding formal or informal “contract” (e.B. internal departmental relations). The agreement can include separate organizations or different teams within an organization. Contracts between the service provider and other third parties are often (wrongly) called SLAs – since the performance level has been set by the (primary) customer, there can be no “agreement” between third parties; These agreements are simply “contracts”. However, operational-level agreements or OLAs can be used by internal groups to support SLAs. If an aspect of a service has not been agreed with the customer, it is not an “SLA”. Service providers need SLAs to manage customer expectations and define severity levels and circumstances in which they are not responsible for failures or performance issues. Customers can also benefit from SLAs because the contract describes the performance characteristics of the service (which can be compared to slAs from other providers) and defines ways to resolve service issues.

In a customer-based SLA, the customer and the service provider enter into a negotiated agreement on the services to be provided. For example, a company can negotiate with the IT service provider that manages its billing system to define in detail its specific relationship and expectations. The key elements of a service level agreement are: Service Performance – Performance metrics and performance levels are defined. Some measures that can specify SLAs include: SLAs typically contain many components, from defining services to terminating the contract. [2] To ensure that SLAs are consistently adhered to, these agreements are often designed with specific dividing lines in mind, and stakeholders need to meet regularly to create an open forum for communication. .